EPP

地球与行星物理

ISSN  2096-3955

CN  10-1502/P

2020 Vol.4(5)

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RESEARCH ARTICLE
SPACE PHYSICS: IONOSPHERIC PHYSICS
Influence of annual atmospheric tide asymmetry on annual anomalies of the ionospheric mean state
ZhiPeng Ren, WeiXing Wan, JianGang Xiong, Xing Li
2020, 4(5): 429-435. doi: 10.26464/epp2020041
Abstract:
Through respectively adding June tide and December tide at the low boundary of the GCITEM-IGGCAS model (Global Coupled Ionosphere–Thermosphere–Electrodynamics Model, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences), we simulate the influence of atmospheric tide on the annual anomalies of the zonal mean state of the ionospheric electron density, and report that the tidal influence varies with latitude, altitude, and solar activity level. Compared with the density driven by the December tide, the June tide mainly increases lower ionospheric electron densities (below roughly the height of 200 km), and decreases electron densities in the higher ionosphere (above the height of 200 km). In the low-latitude ionosphere, tides affect the equatorial ionization anomaly structure (EIA) in the relative difference of electron density, which suggests that tides affect the equatorial vertical E×B plasma drifts. Although the tide-driven annual anomalies do not vary significantly with the solar flux level in the lower ionosphere, in the higher ionosphere the annual anomalies generally decrease with solar activity.
SPACE PHYSICS: AERONOMY
Wavenumber-4 spectral component extracted from TIMED/SABER observations
Xing Li, WeiXing Wan, JinBin Cao, ZhiPeng Ren
2020, 4(5): 436-448. doi: 10.26464/epp2020040
Abstract:
The wavenumber spectral components WN4 at the mesosphere and low thermosphere (MLT) altitudes (70–10 km) and in the latitude range between ±45° are obtained from temperature data (T) observed by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instruments on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)’s Thermosphere–Ionosphere–Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) spacecraft during the 11-year solar period from 2002 to 2012. We analyze in detail these spectral components WNk and obtain the main properties of their vertical profiles and global structures. We report that all of the wavenumber spectral components WNk occur mainly around 100 km altitude, and that the most prominent component is the wavenumber spectral component WN4 structure. Comparing these long duration temperature data with results of previous investigations, we have found that the yearly variation of spectral component WN4 is similar to that of the eastward propagating non-migrating diurnal tide with zonal wavenumber 3 (DE3) at the low latitudes, and to that of the semi-diurnal tide with zonal wavenumber 2 (SE2) at the mid-latitudes: the amplitudes of the A4 are larger during boreal summer and autumn at the low-latitudes; at the mid-latitudes the amplitudes have a weak peak in March. In addition, the amplitudes of component WN4 undergo a remarkable short period variation: significant day-to-day variation of the spectral amplitudes A4 occurs primarily in July and September at the low-latitudes. In summary, we conclude that the non-migrating tides DE3 and SE2 are likely to be the origins, at the low-latitudes and the mid-latitudes in the MLT region, respectively, of the observed wavenumber spectral component WN4.
SPACE PHYSICS: AERONOMY
The source of tropospheric tides
Xing Li, WeiXing Wan, JinBin Cao, ZhiPeng Ren
2020, 4(5): 449-460. doi: 10.26464/epp2020049
Abstract:
With the method of Hough mode decomposition (HMD), the tidal sources of the three main tidal components, namely, the migrating components DW1 (diurnal westward propagating wavenumber 1) and SW2 (semidiurnal westward propagating wavenumber 2) and the non-migrating component DE3 (diurnal eastward propagating wavenumber 3), at the tropospheric altitudes (1–12 km) and in the latitude range of ±60°, were obtained from National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data during the interval from 1988 to 2011. We analyzed these sources in detail at 6 km and obtained the main properties of their yearly variations. The DW1 source was found to present a weak seasonal variation in the lower latitudes (about ±10°–15°). That is, the amplitudes of the DW1 sources were larger in the summer months than in the winter months, and DW1 presented semi-annual variation near the equator (±10°) such that the DW1 source was larger at the equinoxes than at the solstices. In addition, the SW2 source was symmetric and was stronger in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere. The SW2 source presented remarkable annual and semi-annual variation such that the amplitudes were largest during the March equinox months and larger during the June solstice months. In contrast, DE3 appeared mainly around the equatorial latitudes within about ±30°. The DE3 source presented remarkable semi-annual variation that was larger around the solstices than the equinoxes in the southern hemisphere, and it was opposite in the northern hemisphere. By HMD, we found that the tropospheric tides were primarily dominated by some leading propagating Hough modes, specifically, the (1, 1), (2, 3), and (3, 3) modes; the influences of the other Hough modes were negligible. The consequences of an El Niño–Southern Oscillation modulation of tidal amplitudes for the energy and momentum budgets of the troposphere may now be expected to attract attention. In summary, the above yearly variations of the main tidal sources and the Hough coefficients demonstrate that an HMD analysis can be used to investigate the tropospheric tides.
ATMOSPHERIC PHYSICS
Inertial gravity waves observed by a Doppler wind LiDAR and their possible sources
XiangHui Xue, DongSong Sun, HaiYun Xia, XianKang Dou
2020, 4(5): 461-471. doi: 10.26464/epp2020039
Abstract:
In this paper, we use wind observations by a Doppler wind LiDAR near Delingha (37.4°N, 97.4°E), Qinghai, Northwestern China to study the characteristics of inertial gravity waves in the stratosphere. We focus on 10–12 December 2013, a particularly interesting case study. Most of the time, the inertial gravity waves extracted from the LiDAR measurements were stationary with vertical wavelengths of about 9–11 km and horizontal wavelengths of about 800–1000 km. However, for parts of the observational period in this case study, a hodograph analysis indicates that different inertial gravity wave propagation features were present at lower and upper altitudes. In the middle and upper stratosphere (~30–50 km), the waves propagated downward, especially during a period of stronger winds, and to the northwest–southeast. In the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere (~10–20 km), however, waves with upward propagation and northeast–southwest orientation were dominant. By taking into account reanalysis data and satellite observations, we have confirmed the presence of different wave patterns in the lower and upper stratosphere during this part of the observational period. The combined data sets suggest that the different wave patterns at lower and upper height levels are likely to have been associated with the presence of lower and upper stratospheric jet streams.
ATMOSPHERIC PHYSICS
Reponses of middle atmospheric circulation to the 2009 major sudden stratospheric warming
ShengYang Gu, Xin Hou, JiaHui Qi, KeMin TengChen, XianKang Dou
2020, 4(5): 472-478. doi: 10.26464/epp2020046
Abstract:
In this research, the roles of gravity waves and planetary waves in the change to middle atmospheric residual circulation during a sudden stratospheric warming period are differentiated and depicted separately by adopting the downward control principle. Our analysis shows clear anomalous poleward residual circulation patterns from the equator to high latitudes in the lower winter stratosphere. At the same time, upward mean flows are identified at high latitudes of the winter upper stratosphere and mesosphere, which turn equatorward in the mesosphere and reach as far as the tropical region, and consequently the extratropical region in the summer hemisphere. The downward control principle shows that anomalous mesospheric residual circulation patterns, including interhemispheric coupling, are solely caused by the change in gravity wave forcing resulting from the reversal of the winter stratospheric zonal wind. Nevertheless, both planetary waves and gravity waves are important to variations in the winter stratospheric circulation, but with opposite effects.
ATMOSPHERIC PHYSICS
Diurnal variability of the planetary boundary layer height estimated from radiosonde data
Jie Gu, YeHui Zhang, Na Yang, Rui Wang
2020, 4(5): 479-492. doi: 10.26464/epp2020042
Abstract:
Diurnal variations in the planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) at different latitudes over different surface characteristics are described, based on 45 years (1973−2017) of radiosonde observations. The PBLH is determined from the radiosonde data by the bulk Richardson number (BRN) method and verified by the parcel method and the potential temperature gradient method. In general, the BRN method is able to represent the height of the convective boundary layer (BL) and neutral residual layer cases but has relatively large uncertainty in the stable BL cases. The diurnal cycle of the PBLH over land is quite different from the cycle over ocean, as are their seasonal variations. For stations over land, the PBLH shows an apparent diurnal cycle, with a distinct maximum around 15:00 LT, and seasonal variation, with higher values in summer. Compared with the PBLH over land, over oceans the PBLH diurnal cycles are quite mild, the PBLHs are much lower, and the seasonal changes are less pronounced. The seasonal variations in the median PBLH diurnal cycle are positively correlated with the near-surface temperature and negatively correlated with the near-surface relative humidity. Finally, although at most latitudes the daytime PBLH exhibits, over these 45 years, a statistically significant increasing trend at most hours between 12:00 LT and 18:00 LT over both land and ocean, there is no significant trend over either land or ocean in the nighttime PBLH for almost all the studied latitudes.
ATMOSPHERIC PHYSICS
Comparison of stratospheric evolution during the major sudden stratospheric warming events in 2018 and 2019
Zheng Ma, Yun Gong, ShaoDong Zhang, JiaHui Luo, QiHou Zhou, ChunMing Huang, KaiMing Huang
2020, 4(5): 493-503. doi: 10.26464/epp2020044
Abstract:
Using Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) data in the northern hemisphere at the 10 hPa level, we compared the stratospheric evolution of temperature and geopotential height during two major sudden stratosphere warming events (SSWs) that occurred in the Arctic winter of 2018 and 2019. In the prewarming period, poleward temperature-enhanced regions were mainly located around 120°E with a displaced vortex and around 120°E and 60°W with splitting vortices. The evolution of geopotential height indicated that these temperature-enhanced regions were both on the western side of high-latitude anticyclones. In the postwarming period, the polar vortex turned from splitting to displacement in the 2018 SSW but from displacement to splitting in the 2019 SSW. Both transitions were observed over the Atlantic region, which may have been caused by anticyclones moving through the polar region. Our findings revealed that the evolution of the anticyclone is important during SSWs and is closely related to temperature-enhanced regions in the prewarming periods and to transitions of the polar vortices in postwarming periods.
ATMOSPHERIC PHYSICS
Global static stability and its relation to gravity waves in the middle atmosphere
Xiao Liu, JiYao Xu, Jia Yue
2020, 4(5): 504-512. doi: 10.26464/epp2020047
Abstract:
The global atmospheric static stability (N2) in the middle atmosphere and its relation to gravity waves (GWs) were investigated by using the temperature profiles measured by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument from 2002 to 2018. At low latitudes, a layer with enhanced N2 occurs at an altitude of ~20 km and exhibits annual oscillations caused by tropopause inversion layers. Above an altitude of ~70 km, enhanced N2 exhibits semiannual oscillations at low latitudes caused by the mesosphere inversion layers and annual oscillations at high latitudes resulting from the downward shift of the summer mesopause. The correlation coefficients between N2 and GW amplitudes can be larger than 0.8 at latitudes poleward of ~40°N/S. This observation provides factual evidence that a large N2 supports large-amplitude GWs and indicates that N2 plays a dominant role in maintaining GWs at least at high latitudes of the middle atmosphere. This evidence also partially explains the previous results regarding the phase changes of annual oscillations of GWs at high latitudes.
SOLID EARTH: SEISMOLOGY
Effect of lateral heterogeneity on 2-D Rayleigh wave ZH ratio sensitivity kernels based on the adjoint method: Synthetic and inversion examples
Ting Lei, HuaJian Yao, Chao Zhang
2020, 4(5): 513-522. doi: 10.26464/epp2020050
Abstract:
The ratio between vertical and radial amplitudes of Rayleigh waves (hereafter, the Rayleigh wave ZH ratio) is an important parameter used to constrain structures beneath seismic stations. Some previous studies have explored crust and upper mantle structures by joint inversion of the Rayleigh wave ZH ratio and surface wave dispersion. However, all these studies have used a 1-D depth sensitivity kernel, and this kernel may lack precision when the structure varies a great deal laterally. Here, we present a systematic investigation of the two-dimensional (2-D) Rayleigh wave ZH ratio kernel based on the adjoint-wavefield method and perform two synthetic tests using the new kernel. The 2-D ZH ratio kernel is consistent with the traditional 1-D sensitivity kernel but has an asymmetric pattern with a preferred orientation toward the source. The predominant effect caused by heterogeneity can clearly be seen from kernels calculated from models with 2-D heterogeneities, which confirms the necessity of using the new 2-D kernel in some complex regions. Inversion tests using synthetic data show that the 2-D ZH ratio kernel has the potential to resolve small anomalies as well as complex lateral structures.
SOLID EARTH: SEISMOLOGY
Analysis of the role of branching angle in the dynamic rupture process on a 3-D branching fault system
JingXing Fang, Feng Qian, HaiMing Zhang
2020, 4(5): 523-531. doi: 10.26464/epp2020043
Abstract:
The fault branching phenomenon, which may heavily influence the patterns of rupture propagation in fault systems, is one of the geometric complexities of fault systems that is widely observed in nature. In this study, we investigate the effect of the branching angle on the rupture inclination and the interaction between branch planes in two-fork branching fault systems by numerical simulation and theoretical analysis based on Mohr’s circle. A friction law dependent on normal stress is used, and special attention is paid to studying how ruptures on the upper and lower branch planes affect the stress and rupture on each other separately. The results show that the two branch planes affect each other in different patterns and that the intensity of the effect changes with the branching angle. The rupture of the lower branch plane has a negative effect on the rupture of the upper branch plane in the case of a small branching angle but has almost no negative effect in the case of a large branching angle. The rupture of the upper branch plane, however, suppresses the rupture of the lower branch plane regardless of whether the branching angle is large or small.
PERSPECTIVE
SOLID EARTH: SEISMOLOGY
Monitoring of velocity changes based on seismic ambient noise: A brief review and perspective
Qing-Yu Wang, HuaJian Yao
2020, 4(5): 532-542. doi: 10.26464/epp2020048
Abstract:
Over the past two decades, the development of the ambient noise cross-correlation technology has spawned the exploration of underground structures. In addition, ambient noise-based monitoring has emerged because of the feasibility of reconstructing the continuous Green’s functions. Investigating the physical properties of a subsurface medium by tracking changes in seismic wave velocity that do not depend on the occurrence of earthquakes or the continuity of artificial sources dramatically increases the possibility of researching the evolution of crustal deformation. In this article, we outline some state-of-the-art techniques for noise-based monitoring, including moving-window cross-spectral analysis, the stretching method, dynamic time wrapping, wavelet cross-spectrum analysis, and a combination of these measurement methods, with either a Bayesian least-squares inversion or the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. We briefly state the principles underlying the different methods and their pros and cons. By elaborating on some typical noise-based monitoring applications, we show how this technique can be widely applied in different scenarios and adapted to multiples scales. We list classical applications, such as following earthquake-related co- and postseismic velocity changes, forecasting volcanic eruptions, and tracking external environmental forcing-generated transient changes. By monitoring cases having different targets at different scales, we point out the applicability of this technology for disaster prediction and early warning of small-scale reservoirs, landslides, and so forth. Finally, we conclude with some possible developments of noise-based monitoring at present and summarize some prospective research directions. To improve the temporal and spatial resolution of passive-source noise monitoring, we propose integrating different methods and seismic sources. Further interdisciplinary collaboration is indispensable for comprehensively interpreting the observed changes.